Let’s say a homeowner has decided to get new flooring. Two contractors are called, and appointments are scheduled.

Contractor A is the first to meet with the homeowner. Being a competent company, they show up at the appointed time and promise quality products and installation. At the meeting, they bring some samples of actual flooring, have a product brochure, and can access the manufacturer’s website on a computer tablet to show the prospects different colors and styles.

All in all, Contractor A is doing a credible job of presenting their products. They’ve got actual physical samples of the flooring. They’re also using a nice blend of old-style techniques (a brochure) and technology (tablet for showing the manufacturer website) to convey important information to the homeowner.

But how does this look from the homeowner’s point-of-view?

They may not be as engaged by the product sample as Contractor A had hoped. How easy is it for them to visualize how a small sample of flooring will translate when their entire room has it installed?

Bringing a few samples of flooring and showing them a few generic photos from a website is not enough to fully engage the prospect. No one tries to sell somebody a car by detaching the door and saying, ‘look at this, would you like a car that has a door like this?’

Now let’s say that it’s Contractor B’s turn. They bring everything that Contractor A did, but also use home visualization software as part of their product presentation.

This converts the experience from trying to push the homeowner into deciding based on a small sample or generic website pictures, into a true shopping experience for the prospect. The conversation becomes more engaging: “Here’s some samples, but now let me show you how this would look on YOUR home.”

This subtly but powerfully shifts the dynamic of the product presentation. Instead of a sales pitch where you hope they can imagine your product on their home, it becomes a combination of a consultation plus a fun “shopping trip” for flooring.

Contractor B also enjoys two other advantages:

  1. The efficiency of presenting products is enhanced by a home visualizer. Once you have a picture of your prospect’s home loaded and set up in the software, showing product after product is just a matter of clicking your mouse.
  2. Upselling becomes free of friction. During a product presentation, samples are simply not as effective as a home visualizer in selling your higher-end products. Actually seeing the better product on their specific home is an effective motivation for many homeowners.

How is this hypothetical scenario between Contractor A vs. Contractor B most likely to end? Most prospects simply feel more comfortable with a home renovation company that can say, “this is how your home will look when the project is completed – this is what you get for your investment.”